A Day for Staining Tables

Erik is in the middle of a refinishing project for a client. He is working on two tables in oak, a material he doesn’t usually refinish because most modern furniture seems to come in walnut or teak veneer.

The client wanted a change from the golden oak look, so Erik had her pick a stain color she liked. Yesterday, we spent the day staining the various pieces from the tables. (Erik disassembles as much as he can with furniture because it makes each part of the job easier.)

Here are some photos of the tables after the original finish was removed and the pieces were sanded, followed by the pieces stained.

Table legs and skirt awaiting stain. May 2018.
Table legs and skirt awaiting stain. May 2018.

 

Table legs and skirt after being stained. May 2018.
Table legs and skirt after being stained. May 2018.

 

Table top with stain still wet. May 2018.
Table top with stain still wet. May 2018.

 

The other oak table top awaiting stain. May 2018.
The other oak table top awaiting stain. May 2018.

 

The other oak table top with stain. May 2018.
The other oak table top with stain. May 2018.

 

Garrison Hutch Restored

Garrison Hutch (glass inserted), restored April 2018.
Garrison Hutch (glass inserted), restored April 2018.

We’ve handled Garrison hutches in several sizes before at Erik G. Warner Decorative Salvage. This one is one of the wider hutches.

For a person who needs a fashionable cabinet that allows for both hidden storage and storage to showcase special items, this piece fits the bill. Erik has fully refinished this hutch, reinforcing the legs and subframe in order to give it more stability.

It measures 48″ wide x 15″ deep x 68″ high.

This Garrison hutch is available for purchase at MidModMen+friends. Stop by the store to check it out.

Note: This item has SOLD.

 

Garrison hutch, glass doors removed to provide clearer view of upper shelves, April 2018.
Garrison hutch, glass doors removed to provide clearer view of upper shelves, April 2018.

Mid-Century United Dresser Set – Refinished Using Dye Stain Under Oil Stain

United dresser set refinish.

I am NOT an expert and I don’t even play one on TV.**

I just thought I’d share the process I used in my first effort at using a dye stain layered beneath an oil stain in an attempt to give a little depth and warmth to the finish on this set.

The original finish was similar to a blonde finish, though in a different color/tone.

United dresser set as purchased at auction.
United dresser set as purchased at auction.
The first step was to strip off the old finish. I used Klean Strip 15 minute variety. (sorry, I forgot to take a pic of the can so I swiped an image from the interwebs). After scraping the stripper I washed with Lacquer thinner; would have used straight Acetone but I was out.
The first step was to strip off the old finish. I used Klean Strip 15 minute variety. (sorry, I forgot to take a pic of the can so I swiped an image from the interwebs).
After scraping the stripper I washed with Lacquer thinner; would have used straight Acetone but I was out.
Once the finish was removed I sanded with 150 and then 180 grit.
Once the finish was removed I sanded with 150 and then 180 grit.
After sanding came the dye stain. I went with TransTint orange mixed in water. I chose water because it would give me a little more open time. I figured that, being new to this, I might need some extra time to move the color around to blend out any potential streaks or runs.
After sanding came the dye stain. I went with TransTint orange mixed in water. I chose water because it would give me a little more open time. I figured that, being new to this, I might need some extra time to move the color around to blend out any potential streaks or runs.
United low-boy, dye stained orange.
United low-boy, dye stained orange.
The next step after the dye was a sealer coat of dewaxed shellac. I happened to have enough Ruby that I had mixed for another project left over so I used that.   I had this thinned to a 1 pound cut. When spraying you have to adjust your fluid and air flow rates (if using a compressor set-up) and have to make sure you move the gun at the right speed so you get an even application but don't deposit so much material that you get runs and sags.
The next step after the dye was a sealer coat of dewaxed shellac. I happened to have enough Ruby that I had mixed for another project left over so I used that.
I had this thinned to a 1 pound cut. When spraying you have to adjust your fluid and air flow rates (if using a compressor set-up) and have to make sure you move the gun at the right speed so you get an even application but don’t deposit so much material that you get runs and sags.
After a little light sanding I applied General Finishes Mahogany stain.
After a little light sanding I applied General Finishes Mahogany stain.
Here's the hi-boy post stain application.
Here’s the hi-boy post stain application.
Once the stain had dried, I gave it two + days, I laid down several (3-4) coats of 1 pound cut SealCoat de-waxed shellac. I didn't have enough of the ruby left and was able to pick this up at a local shop so I could move the project forward.
Once the stain had dried, I gave it two + days, I laid down several (3-4) coats of 1 pound cut SealCoat de-waxed shellac. I didn’t have enough of the ruby left and was able to pick this up at a local shop so I could move the project forward.
Up after the shellac were a few coats of lacquer. Went with Watco Satin, thinned about 25% on the first two coats, and then about 50% on a final coat.
Up after the shellac were a few coats of lacquer. Went with Watco Satin, thinned about 25% on the first two coats, and then about 50% on a final coat.
United low-boy all finished. Hoping it has a nice glowing orange, Mahogany look.
United low-boy all finished. Hoping it has a nice glowing orange, Mahogany look.

**Editor’s note: It is obvious that Erik wrote this post because he immediately starts out by downplaying any of the skill he has earned over the 6 years he’s been working on refinishing furniture. His education started long before that, when he was a boy watching his Grandma Lillian refinishing furniture. Erik’s work speaks for itself and I’m pretty sure most of the pieces he’s refinished are very happy with their new look (as are the customers who purchase them). – Mary

 

Mid-Century Vibe Becomes Erik G. Warner Decorative Salvage

Fans of Mid-Century Vibe, we’ve got news. We’re changing our name from Mid-Century Vibe to Erik G. Warner Decorative Salvage.

How did we get to this point?

At the end of November 2014, we lost our workshop space. We took the occasion to re-examine our business, the mid-century market, and Erik’s penchant for picking. We realized that we wanted to expand beyond mid-century modern items. Our business name was not going to allow us to do that, so we decided to rebrand.

After much thought, we decided to use Erik’s name for the business, allowing him the ability to pick whatever is interesting while out on the road. We are still HUGE fans of mid-century and modern furniture and decorative items, so they will always remain a big part of what we offer.

However, Erik describes his aesthetic as “modern with a punk rock attitude,” meaning if you want to throw an early 1900s ornate table into a room filled with modern furniture, go for it! If you want to use a fabulous hospital gurney as a chaise lounge, do it! Don’t let some outside “authority” tell you what you can and can’t do with your personal space in the interest of “pure” modernism. Our design philosophy is that if you want to mix modernism with Victorian, or industrial with Deco, or any other sort of mash-up, you should do so.

If you’re looking for a blended style, Erik G. Warner Decorative Salvage can help you. If you’re looking for a specific piece, let us know. We’ll try to find it.

—–

A big part of our rebranding has been switching over account names, including this website, Gmail, and Twitter.

Our web address is now: erikgwarner.com

Gmail: warner.erikg@gmail.com

Twitter: @ErikGWarner

Items from Erik G. Warner Decorative Salvage are available for sale through our website Shop. (See the sidebar menu.) When you’re ready to purchase, you’ll be taken to our Square Marketplace page to complete the sale. (You can also shop directly from our Square Marketplace page if you prefer.)

Our Mid-Century Vibe Etsy page will remain live for a couple more months and then will be shut down. Feel free to check items out there in the meantime.

The last big social media account we have to switch over is Facebook, which we’ll be doing soon. Turns out we have to request a name change from Facebook, but we didn’t want to give everyone a big shock by changing it without an announcement.

As we go through this transition, we’ll be acquiring new and fascinating inventory to add to our online shop. We’ll keep you posted as new items become available.

Thanks for your support.

 

 

A. Eberoth – Kontorsmobler Rail Ticket Agent Cabinet

We know. We know. Our business name is “Mid-Century Vibe”, meaning we deal in stuff from the mid 20th century. Try though we might to stick to that, sometimes we just run across something soooooo cool we can’t not buy it. We’re kinda like Julianne Moore in that scene from “The Lost World: Jurassic Park” that way.  “She can’t not touch” and we can’t not buy. This antique rail road ticket agent’s cabinet is one of those things.

It is marked “AEK – A. Eberoth – Kontorsmobler/Stockholm” and features dual down-pull roll-top desk style doors that reveal a wealth of storage, from pull out shelves to open spaces.  It is constructed of wood with oak veneer and includes the key. We have decided to leave this beauty as is. Its chips, dings, and coffee cup ring add to its character and give it life. It would function perfectly well as the storage cabinet it was intended to be, but would also make a lovely bar cabinet.

A. Eberoth - Kontorsmobler Rail Road Ticket Agent's Cabinet.
A. Eberoth – Kontorsmobler Rail Road Ticket Agent’s Cabinet.
A. Eberoth - Kontorsmobler Rail Road Ticket Agent's Cabinet.
A. Eberoth – Kontorsmobler Rail Road Ticket Agent’s Cabinet.
A. Eberoth - Kontorsmobler Rail Road Ticket Agent's Cabinet.
A. Eberoth – Kontorsmobler Rail Road Ticket Agent’s Cabinet.

**SOLD**

58″h x 41.5″w x 17″d.

This piece is available at MidModMen+friends, 2401 University Avenue West, St. Paul, MN.